We get it (and IT!)

Phone: 1300-728-259 or .

Category Archives: Gmail

Find the mail you want in Gmail

How many times have you looked through your inbox for a specific email or file and ended up grumpy because you couldn’t find it? With hundreds or thousands of emails plus a certain number of attached files stored up in your inbox these days, sorting through them can be a hassle. Here are 6 search operators from Gmail that will help you locate what you need in no time.

1. Where did I put that file?

Looking for a file your colleagues sent you ages ago? Don’t remember the file’s specific name but you do recall some keywords? That’s a good start. Simply type a keyword after filename: to search for a particular file. For example, you can typefilename: minutes to search for a file named meeting minutes. Don’t even remember a part of the name but know what type of file it is? Then you can also use the same search operator to search for a file type. For example, typefilename: doc to search for document files.

2. CC or BCC

There are times when you want to narrow down the recipients: whether they are direct, carbon copy (cc), or blind carbon copy (bcc) receivers. The basic “To” search boxes are proven to be useless in this case. What you can do to be more specific is to type cc: or bcc: followed by the recipients’ names or email addresses. For example, instead of typing “anna” in the “To” search box, you can type cc: anna to look for email sent to Anna as a carbon copy (cc) only. Note that you won’t be able to find messages that you received on bcc.

3. Search by time period

You don’t have to remember the exact dates to be able to search for a specific email. With the search operators before: or after:, you can just type the period when the email is sent or received. Don’t forget to use the date format yyyy/mm/dd, otherwise, Gmail wouldn’t get it. By typing after: 2016/07/01before: 2016/07/15, Gmail will look for emails sent or received between July 1, 2016 and July 15, 2016.

4. Search for read, unread, or starred messages

You can search for messages that are read, unread, or starred by using is:read,is:unread, is:starred. By typing is:read is:starred from:Anna you are searching for messages from Anna that have been read and marked with a star. If you have more than one type of stars (or if you don’t, we suggest you learn how to manage your emails with Gmail’s stars option), you can type has:green-star to search for messages marked with that color.

5. Don’t ignore Spam or Trash

Whether using the simple search box or search operators suggested above, both ignore emails that are in Spam or Trash box. And from time to time, important emails can mistakably be thrown into Trash box for some unknown reasons. Usein:anywhere to look everywhere in your inbox, including those two places, to make sure that no important email has slipped through.

6. Look in the chat box too

We all hate it when our colleagues send important files or message via a chat box. That makes it difficult when searching for them later. But by typing is:chatfollowed by keywords or name of the person you’re communicating with, you can actually search for messages or files in the chat log. Next time you can tell your colleagues to send vital files or information via proper email instead. But if that still doesn’t work, now you know how to help yourself.

When it comes to managing and sorting through confidential emails in your inbox, no one can do it besides you. Yet there are still the matters of database management and security to take into consideration. Why not outsource those issues to us and enjoy a more carefree communication with your colleagues and customers? Call us today to see what our experts can do for you.

Looking at aliases for Gmail

Google_Aug18_AEmail is one of the most important communication tools for almost every employee and business. The problem many of us face however is sorting the non-important from important emails, or even separating personal and work emails. One solution most major email providers offer, to allow people to separate email types, is the alias. Did you know that aliases for Gmail is a feature that you may find helpful for your business?

About the Gmail alias

When you first sign up for a Gmail or Google account you are asked to pick an email address or username. Your username becomes the first part of your email address, and is what you will likely give to most people. There are times however where you may not want to give out your email address, but are still required to e.g., signing up for a newsletter.

What many email providers have done is implement an alias feature that allows you to set up a separate email address that can be managed by your main account. When an email is sent to your alias address, it shows up in your main account’s Inbox. Google doesn’t offer this feature in the traditional sense, instead the company has opted for a slightly different take on aliases.

With Google, you can add a suffix to the main part of your email address to essentially create an alias. The way this works is you add ‘+alias’ to the main part of your email address. Any emails sent to this address will show up in your Inbox, but to the sender they are being sent to a different address.

Setting up an alias in Gmail

With Gmail you don’t have to create a completely different account, you can create an alias email address instead. Let’s say you are starting to sign up for an increasing number of email newsletters, what you can do is add a suffix like +newsletter to your email address, so it will look like:user.name+newsletter@gmail.com.

You can then use this email for when you are signing up for newsletters, and they will be sent to that address. The key here is that you can create as many +alias addresses as you want, and the emails sent to that address will show up in your Inbox.

Why use an alias?

At first thought this may seem like a bit of a non-feature, after all who really wants to create an alias like this? Well, the main reason this is a useful feature is because of Gmail’s Filters and Labels. You can use these two features to sort and automatically action emails sent to a specific email alias. When you combine the +alias feature with these, you have a pretty powerful way to manage your Inbox.

Here are a few examples of how people are using this feature:

1. For newsletters and other non-essential emails

We all get these emails and while they aren’t overly important they might contain useful information we want. The problem is that these emails can be annoying and always seem to be multiplying.

One solution is to use a +alias, like +news or +newsletters, when signing up for emails like this. Then, go into Gmail and create a filter that automatically labels all emails sent to the address with something like Updates, or even archive them. To be most effective, try setting the filter so that these emails automatically skip the Inbox, meaning you won’t get a notification when you have a new email.

2. For VIPs

If you have a number of clients who you work closely with, or you want to make sure you don’t miss anything from them, they why not set an alias likeuser.name+vip@gmail.com that you can then give to them.

From there, set up a filter in Gmail that automatically marks emails sent to this address as important and top priority. If you set it to automatically add a bright label as well, you increase the chances of seeing the email more quickly and will know it’s important right away.

3. For impromptu reminders

We have all been in a situation where we want to send ourselves a reminder to do something later. One thing we can do is to email an alias likeuser.name+reminder@gmail.com with the reminder.

In Gmail, set up a filter to automatically label every email sent to the above email address with a label like Reminder. These emails can also go right to the archives and skip the Inbox, but when you click the Reminder label, they will still show up. If you are diligent in deleting these emails, this could work as a great way to send yourself important reminders – especially because we already look at our email so much; it will be practically in front of us.

If you are looking to learn more about aliases for Gmail and how it can be used in your business, get in touch with us.

Unthreading Gmail messages

GoogleApps_Dec08_CBusinesses around the world are finding that Gmail is one of the most reliable and portable email platforms out there today. With powerful tools that bring messages together and allow us to gain control of our Inbox, Gmail has become the platform of choice for many. One tool that allows us to keep better control of our Inbox is message threading. Here is an overview of this feature and how to change its behavior.

What is email threading?

When email was first created, email platforms treated each message that was sent or delivered as a separate message, even if it was a reply to a previous message. Over time, email became less about individual messages and more about conversations. Look at your emails and chances are that many individual emails are really about one core message or connected to one main conversation.

If you use Gmail, this conversation, based on an original message, is threaded together. This means that you have one conversation (the main email) with many messages going back and forth. Receive a new message and it is added to the conversation at the top of the thread. If you want to see older messages you simply scroll down the thread once it is open.

While this is a great way to display messages, in a compact way that cuts down on the number of emails in your Inbox, longer threads can become unruly, making it more difficult to actually find a specific message because it is in the midst of a thread. Beyond this, some users prefer to have non-threaded messages, with all messages listed separately.

How to unthread your emails

To unthread your emails simply:

  1. Log into your Google account and open Gmail.
  2. Press the cog in the top-right of the screen.
  3. Select Settings from the drop-down menu.
  4. Scroll down to Conversation View.
  5. Tick Conversation view so that it is off.
  6. Press Save Changes at the bottom of the screen.

What will happen when you do this

Once you press Save Changes you should be taken back to your inbox and you will notice a few changes. Firstly the number of emails in your Inbox will be higher, and secondly, messages that were threaded will now be added individually, based on when they arrived into your Inbox. If you are looking for these messages, you will need to either scroll through your Inbox or search for them using keywords and other search operators.

It should also be noted that when you reply to emails, a new message will be sent to both your sent folder and main Inbox, but the replies will not show up in the body of the message you replied to.

If you are looking to learn more about using Gmail in your office, contact us today to see how we can help employ the right tech tools to enhance your business efficiency.

This entry was posted in Cloud – Google Apps, General Articles C and tagged, , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Both comments and trackbacks are currently closed.