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Category Archives: Windows 10

7 things every Windows 10 user should know

Windows 10 stands tall as Microsoft’s best operating system release to date, hands down. But having undergone serious revamping, the OS is ready to rock and scroll. Boasting a myriad of new features, the updated Windows 10 is both efficient and effortless — fully capable of redefining your computing experience for good. Become a Windows 10 power user in no time with these seven tips:

Master virtual desktops

Virtual desktops allow for better utilization of screen space. You can span your applications and windows across multiple “virtual” desktops. Create one by clicking on the “Task View” icon (located at the right of the Cortana bar) on the taskbar, then click “+ New Desktop” in the lower right corner and add as many desktops as you wish. To move an application to a new desktop, merely drag it into the virtual desktop on the bottom.

Next-level screenshotting

The original screenshotting methods on Windows include Windows + Prt Scn, which captures the screen and saves it into the Screenshots folder; and Alt + Prt Scn, which captures the screen and copies it to your clipboard.

Introducing the new built-in Snipping Tool. On top of capturing a full screen screenshot, other capturing options range from a free-form rectangle to a specific aspect ratio or even an entire window as well. You can also set the capture to delay a screenshot by a set interval — this comes in handy when you want to screenshot a YouTube video minus the playback controls.

Shake and minimize

For users who aren’t aware of this trick, you can grab a window by its bar and literally shake your mouse. This causes all the other windows to automatically minimize.

Professional Windows snapping

Snapping windows to certain parts of the screen is ideal for multitasking. You can now organize and monitor different applications more seamlessly. Make the most of your screen space with the following tips:

Drag a window to the right or left to split it in half.
Drag a window to a corner to reduce it to a fourth of its size.
Drag a window to the top to maximize its size.

Record your screen with the Xbox app

After launching the Xbox app, go to the app you wish to record and press Windows + G. You’ll be prompted with a window that asks: “Do you want to open the Game bar?” Click on the “Yes, this is a game” box and let the recording begin!

Talk to Cortana like a person

Aside from typing your requests, you can also use natural language to ask Cortana to locate your vacation photos, or provide directions to your friend’s house. No date needed, just specific words and she’s all set. Cortana is also synced with your calendar, so if you’re ever unsure when your meetings are, Cortana will gladly double-check.

Automatic Battery Saver mode

When activating battery saver in Windows 10, you can limit your portable devices’ background activity and push notifications to prolong battery life. Battery saver also kicks in automatically once your battery life is lower than 20%. To customize your own power threshold as well as which applications you allow to run in the background, go to Settings > System > Battery saver — voilà!

Make the most of Windows 10 with these tips and upgrade your user status from regular to power. Regardless of what you’re using it for — arranging your meetings or planning your vacation — make each computing experience a memorable one. Want to hear more of the latest Windows 10 news and updates? Contact us today.

How to fix these Windows 10 problems

Where has all my storage space gone? Why isn’t the Windows Update working? How can I play a DVD on my PC? A lot of Windows 10 users are frustrated with these problems and still, they don’t know how to fix them. Let us be your guide. Here we’ve provided the answers to the 6 most popular Windows 10 issues.

1. Decreased storage space

You might not be aware that after the upgrade to Windows 10, the old version of Windows isn’t deleted but is kept in the C:/ drive by the name of windows.old, which eats up a huge chunk of your disk space. Microsoft makes it this way just in case you change your mind and want to go back to your previous version. However, if you’re sure you want to permanently delete it, just follow these steps:

Click the Windows Start button and search for the Disk Cleanup app by typingcleanup. The drive selection box will appear, choose the drive your OS is installed on (the default drive is C:/drive), then wait for Windows to scan your system. Afterward, a box will pop up.

At this point, the system might present you with a list of files to delete, but if that’s not visible, select the Clean up system files option on the bottom left of the window. Windows will then present you with another box with the option to delete Previous Windows Installation(s). Tick the option and click OK, then click Delete Files to confirm your decision.

2. Updates that don’t work

First off, check if you’ve upgraded to the Windows 10 Fall update. If the problems still occur, download and run the Windows Update Troubleshooter, then restart the system and try to update again.

If that still doesn’t work, check that System Restore is configured (see number 3 below) and create a restore point. Type Window+X and select Command Prompt (Admin), type net stop wuauserv and hit Enter, then type net stop bits and Enter. Then open Explorer, go to C:\Windows\SoftwareDistribution and delete its contents including any sub-folders. Restart your PC, open Windows Update and click Check for updates.

3. System Restore isn’t enabled

In Windows 10, the System Restore isn’t enabled by default. To turn it on, go to the Start Menu and search for Create a restore point. The System Properties box will appear. From there, choose the system drive and click the Configure button, then select Turn on system protection. Use the slider to set an appropriate amount of maximum disk space (about 5GB should be enough). Note that the update to Windows 10 version 10586 turns this off again so make sure to turn it back on after you update.

4. Privacy violations

Windows 10 faces a lot of criticism over its data-sharing defaults. We recommend you review them from time to time. To change the privacy settings, go to the Start Menu and go to Settings, open the app and select Privacy. At this point, you’ll see on the left-hand side a list of data such as your computer’s camera, microphone, account information and so on. Turn off the ones that you don’t want Windows to have access to.

If you use Windows Defender, click the back arrow, select Update & Security, then select Windows Defender, see if you’re ok with the default setting that enables Cloud-based detection and Automatic sample submission.

Another privacy issue is Window Wi-Fi Sense, which is initially designed to get you connected to wireless networks more quickly. But if you’re not comfortable with the idea of sharing your network’s wireless credentials among devices you can’t control, you can go to Start > Settings > Network & Internet, then click Manage Wi-Fi settings in the right of the window, tick all of the boxes under For networks I select, share them with my to disable Wi-Fi sense.

5. Windows 10 uses up all the 4G data

Windows 10 uses your internet bandwidth in the background. Follow these steps to stop it from consuming all your cellular data without you knowing: go to Settings and then Network & Internet, select Wi-Fi and then Advanced Options, turn on Set as metered connection. Note that this tip won’t work if your PC connects to the internet via Ethernet.

6. There’s no DVD player app

Strangely, Windows 10 was launched without a DVD player app, which means you can’t watch films on your PC. However, if you upgrade to Windows 10 from Windows 7 Home Premium, Windows 7 Professional, Windows 7 Ultimate, Windows 8 with Windows Media Center or Windows 8.1 with Windows Media Center, you’ll find a late released DVD app from Microsoft in Window Store for free download. But if you’re not one of the lucky users mentioned above, we recommend you to download VLC Media Player instead. It’s free!

We hope these 6 Windows 10 problems fixes will help smoothen your experience with Windows 10. But while there are some issues you can cover by yourself, others are more complicated and would better be handled by IT experts. Why not call us today? Our staff is here to eliminate your Windows 10 headaches.

Tips to speed Windows 10 on your computer

If you’ve finally made the upgrade to Windows 10, you may be disappointed that it’s running slower than expected. You may wonder, what’s the cause of this? Well, thankfully there are a few typical culprits, and solutions to fix them. Here are four steps you can take to significantly speed up your Windows 10 OS.

Prevent programs from launching at startup

Windows loads several programs at startup so they’re quickly available. While Microsoft likely has good intentions for doing this, the auto-launch can also slow down the speed of your computer. To fix this issue, you’ll need to make some manual adjustments in the settings.

To see what programs are launching during startup, press Ctrl+Shift+Esc. Next, click on the startup tab of the Task Manager window, where you can easily disable any programs you don’t want launching at startup. However, there will likely be a few programs you’re unsure about. For those, it’s best to play it safe and keep them enabled.

Get rid of useless applications

Having a large amount of programs on your computer takes up valuable memory and hard disk space. In other words, it slows your computer down and makes it work harder than necessary. To quickly clean out your unused programs, follow these steps:

  1. Type Change or remove a program into the taskbar search box (this will show you all the apps stored on your computer)
  2. Select the program/s you no longer want, and click Uninstall.

Once you do this, you’ll then be guided through a number of steps to complete the uninstallation process.

Tidy up your disks

While most people like to clean out their houses come Spring, why not do so with your computer sometime this month? Thankfully, Microsoft’s Disk Cleaner tool makes it easy to do so.

To find Disk Cleaner, right-click any drive in File Explorer and select Properties and Disk Cleanup under the General tab. Once open, it will automatically find files that may be taking up unnecessary space, such as temporary Internet and system memory dump files, and presents them to you for your review. Once you’ve looked them over, you can easily erase them by simply clicking OK.

Turn off apps running in the background

Much to your surprise, there are likely some programs running in the background of your Windows 10 OS that you’re completely unaware of. Microsoft has enabled their native universal apps to do this so you can quickly access their features. However, it also will cause some slow down to your CPU, so you might want to disable them.

To find out what programs are running in the background, navigate to Start Menu>Settings>Privacy>Background apps. Then, switch off the programs you don’t want running at all times.

By following these four steps, you are sure to see a noticeable difference in the speed of your PC. If you’d like to learn more about how to optimize your Windows system or need assistance with your other Microsoft products, feel free to give us a call.

Windows 10 Privacy Protection Tips

It takes seconds to infiltrate and obtain private information. And while it’s unlikely that Microsoft will cause your business financial ruin with their data collection, the fact is that Windows 10 gathers a ridiculous amount of private information from users. So here are some tips that will enhance your privacy when using the operating system.

Say goodbye to ad tracking

Every time you log on to surf the net, you are leaving a trail of breadcrumbs that lead directly to your online profile. This problem is easily solved by deactivating ad tracking. With Windows 10, however, it goes a tad further by using an advertising ID. They not only gather information based on web browsing but also when you use Windows 10 apps.

If you find this bothersome, launch the Settings app, go to General, and look for “Change privacy options”. You then move the slider from on to off, but if you want to make absolutely sure you have no virtual stalkers, head to choice.microsoft.com/en-us/opt-out and disable the “Personalized ads whenever I use my Microsoft account” tab.

Slip off the grid

Thanks to location tracking, nearby restaurants and future weather predictions are at your fingertips. While some might not mind this feature, there are others who wish to enjoy some privacy from their smartphones every once in awhile. To do so, launch the Settings app, then Privacy, and disable the Location tab.

But if you wish to share your location with certain apps, scroll down and activate the ‘Choose apps that can use your location’ tab, and choose your desired apps. Also, regularly clearing your location history doesn’t hurt either.

Cortana, why so clingy?

Albeit a very helpful digital assistant, Cortana requires access to your personal information. Turning it off completely just stops some of her data-collection, since whatever data she already knows, is stored in the cloud. So to break up for good, log into your Microsoft account and then clear all the information Cortana and other Microsoft services (ex. Bing maps) have gathered.

Other measures include clearing the information in your interests section or heading over to the “interest manager” tab and edit which interests you wish Cortana to track.

Disable Wi-Fi Sense?

This feature is designed to let you easily share Wi-Fi connections, but some have misunderstood it to be an opportunity to log onto your network and be naughty. Wi-Fi Sense allows you to share your network’s bandwidth with specific people while ensuring they can’t access your entire network. Vice versa, it lets you connect to Wi-Fi networks your friends share with you.

If it still worries you, launch the Setting app, go to Network & Internet > Wi-Fi > and click on Wi-Fi Sense. From there, deactivate two bars: “Connect to suggested open hotspots” and “Connect to networks shared my contacts”.

Prioritize privacy

All of the aforementioned tips should take about five to ten minutes to implement, but if you’d like to take it one step further, launch the Settings app, go to Privacy, and look on the left-hand side. Here, you will find various settings that allow you to make very detailed adjustments to your privacy. Enjoy!

We hope you find these five privacy protection tips helpful. If you need more help protecting your information or securing your network, give us a call.

Avoid the Windows10 upgrade

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Repetition is a proven way to incite people into action. Children use it to break down their parents’ psyche and get them to buy the latest toy, and advertisers use it to sell their product. Now, Microsoft is using the same tactic to try and get you to upgrade to Windows 10. But this time, you don’t have to stand for it. You can silence their annoying popups up for now, and here’s how you can do it.

If you’re like many people who are happy with their current Microsoft operating system, you may have no desire to upgrade to Windows 10. And while Microsoft seems to be doing everything they can to force your hand, like no longer offering security updates for Windows 8, upgrading is still avoidable for now. So if you’d like to get rid of the annoying prompts that are likely pestering you on a regular basis, it is possible to do so. And believe it or not, Microsoft themselves have released instructions on how to do this and they can be found their website.

How to block Windows 10 prompts

To block Windows 10 popups, you will need to dig into your PC’s registry and disable the upgrade path. However, a word of warning before you start: editing your registry incorrectly can cause serious problems to your PC. Before you make any modifications, back up your computer and registry in case anything goes wrong. In other words, at this point you’re proceeding at your own risk.

If you are a Windows 7 Pro, Ultimate or Windows 8.1 Pro user and have admin permissions on the computer, follow these steps.

  1. Open up group policy editor (gpedit.msc)
  2. Browse to Computer Configuration>Administrative Templates>Windows Components>Windows Update Policy
  3. Switch on the Turn off the upgrade to the latest version of Windows through Windows Update setting

For users who are on a non-Enterprise version of Windows 7 or 8.1, you will need to input the below registry key in manually:

Subkey: HKLM\Software\Policies\Microsoft\Windows\Gwx
DWORD value: DisableGwx = 1

And that’s all there is to it. Now you will no longer be bothered with popups bugging you to upgrade to Windows 10.

That being said, if you are currently running Windows 8 you need to make sure that you’ve upgraded to the latest “8.1 Update” version of the software so that you can enjoy continued ‘Mainstream Support’ (including new features) until 9 January 2018 and ‘Extended Support’ (security patches) until 10 January 2023. If you’re running the original Windows 8.0 you will no longer have support and your systems could be at risk.

If you would like additional assistance in blocking Windows notifications or help with other IT related needs, we are happy to be of service. Get in touch with us today.

Microsoft Office is going mobile

Tablets with Windows 10 installed received a boost recently with the unveiling of the new Office Mobile applications. The mobile versions of the iconic Word, Excel, PowerPoint and OneNote applications are specifically designed for use on tablets. The “touch-first” interface allows users to easily edit documents while on the go. The best news of all is the fact that Office Mobile apps are free for users of Windows 10.

One of the biggest complaints about trying to edit a Microsoft Office file from a tablet is usability, or lack thereof. That has all changed, at least for Windows 10 users, with Microsoft’s recent release of Office Mobile apps. The tablet-friendly versions of Word, Excel, PowerPoint and OneNote have been built from the ground up to improve touch functionality.

Even if you don’t have Windows 10, you still might be intrigued about the potential of having Office apps that are touch-friendly. Here are some of the new features you can enjoy when using Office Mobile apps.

Word

Microsoft Word Mobile has all the tools and features of the PC version including more nuanced tasks like being able to track changes and add footnotes. The Read mode, a mobile exclusive, improves the way documents appear by making them flow better on the smaller screens of a tablet while also letting you zoom in and out with a simple tap of the screen.

Excel

Recommended Charts is the prominent feature of the Excel Mobile app. It allows you to quickly show off your data using a stylish chart or graph with only a few taps. You will also find that reordering columns, adding formulae, changing chart types and the majority of Excel’s other core functions are easier than ever before.

PowerPoint

Of course Office wouldn’t be Office without PowerPoint. The mobile version of the app allows you to edit slides with new touch gestures. This makes it easy to insert and edit pictures, tables, shapes and SmartArt. But the real star here, and of the entire Office Mobile setup, is the Presenter View. This mode gives you full control over what your audience sees on the big screen during a presentation while still letting you view your speaker notes on the tablet.

OneNote

Windows 10 comes installed with OneNote, so you’re probably already using it. Tablet users will notice that changes made by anyone working in the notebook are automatically saved and synchronized for everyone to see.

The release of Office Mobile apps is just one of three big launches to come from Microsoft in 2015. Both Microsoft Office 2016 and Office Mobile for phones are slated for release this fall. Yet, while these tablet applications represent marked improvements for Windows 10 tablet users, they are probably not quite enough to warrant the switch from other operating systems just yet. In fact, even if you’re in love with the idea of having user-friendly, mobile versions of Office, you might want to hang on in there – it’s likely Microsoft will release them for iOS and Android in the near future, too.

Want to know what hardware and software is best for your company? Want to increase productivity in your office? Get in touch with us and we’ll show you how to do it.

This entry was posted in General Articles A, Microsoft Office – News & Tips and tagged Excel, Microsoft, Mobile apps, Office, Powerpoint, Productivity, Tablet, Windows 10, Word. Bookmark the permalink. Both comments and trackbacks are currently closed.

Updates in Windows build 10149

While there have been rumours circling online about Microsoft’s plan to kill the Windows Phone altogether, the tech giant’s latest release for the Windows Insider Program – where users can sign up for an early build of the Windows OS – proves otherwise. Here we’ll take a look at the new Windows build 10149 OS, a preview to Windows 10, and see if it’s worth installing or if you’re better off waiting.

Microsoft Edge

The first thing you’ll notice in this build is a brand new browser, Microsoft Edge. Microsoft Edge is set to replace Internet Explorer as the default web browser on Windows 10 PCs, smartphones and tablets. It is integrated with Cortana and OneDrive, and also includes annotation tools, reading mode, and the option to browse websites in either mobile or desktop view. Do note that Microsoft Edge has a new app ID, meaning favorites, cookies, history and reading-list items that you saved in the Project Spartan app will be lost after upgrading.

General UX improvements

Among the many refinements in this build is the clear and crisp Start screen. Visuals and icons such as volume controls are updated and are more responsive to use, and the navigation bar can now be hidden. Microsoft has also fixed issues like text notifications not appearing for incoming messages, as well as apps that couldn’t be installed or updated.

Cortana refinements

The Windows build 10149 sees Cortana’s Notebook in its final stage, with combined Profile and Settings experience. You can now send an email by saying everything at once – such as who you want to email (you can give the names of multiple recipients), the subject of the email, and what you want your message to say. And with an Internet connection, you can also make corrections with your voice – though this only works for US English right now.

Flash to flashlight

One of the most popular requests of Microsoft from its users was to add a Flashlight “quick action” to allow you to turn your phone’s camera flash into a flashlight, and that’s exactly what they’ve added. To enable this feature, simply open Action Center and expand Quick Actions.

Improved Photos app

The update to the Photos app includes new capabilities such as support for animated GIFs (which works with phones with at least 16GB of RAM). Links to your saved photos, screenshots, and camera roll are also available on the Albums page.

Overall, the Windows build 10149 looks to be an important turning point for Windows 10 Mobile. It is faster and more stable, and comes with plenty of improvements that enhance practicality for everyday use. To try it out, make sure you’re part of the Windows Insider Program by signing up here. Looking to learn more about the benefits of Windows Phone? Contact us today; we’re sure we can help.

This entry was posted in General Articles C, Mobile Phone – Windows Phone and tagged windows 10 os, Windows build 10149, windows insider os,windows insider program, windows phone. Bookmark the permalink. Both comments and trackbacks are currently closed.

Windows 95 “Start Me Up” commercial

In the early ’90s Microsoft surveyed people on what they didn’t like about Windows 3.1. The most common answer was “Everything”, but more specifically a large percentage said they “Just didn’t know where to start.” So, they came up with the Start menu to give those people a leg up. They also licensed the Rolling Stones’ anthem Start Me Up for their ad campaign. That’s right… Windows 95 could make a make a grown man cry.

So what did Microsoft really pay The Rolling Stones to use “Start Me Up” as the soundtrack for the advertising campaign that launched Windows 95?

Rumors over the years have pegged the price at anywhere between $8 million and $14 million, although that range has been dismissed as way too high by those supposedly in the know. Now retired Microsoft chief operating officer Bob Herbold has set the record straight in an interview with the Puget Sound Business Journal posted on TechFlash.

Since I was ever-so-slightly irritated by being forced to listen to an audio clip that accompanies the story to get the answer, I won’t make you do the same: Microsoft paid Mick and the boys about $3 million, according to Herbold.

Windows 10 good or bad?

We are excited about Windows 10: a free upgrade for virtually all Windows users, and one that will bring with it a raft of new features and functionality. But there are some down sides to the Windows 10 upgrate, and it is likely to be a tough one to avoid. In this article we outline the five worst Windows 10 sacrifices. You will miss them when they are gone. (For more on Windows 10, see Windows 10 UK release date, price, features UK.)

Windows 10 is go across the world, with 190 countries now able to get access to what Microsoft call a ‘new era’. Let’s take a look at how this new operating system looks after some hands-on time.

Windows 8 was a disorienting operating system. There was the Start Screen aimed at tablet computers, with big buttons and multitouch elements, and the classical Desktop, a completely isolated instance of the old Windows experience. The OS was big and bold in some areas, while remaining safe and just plain confusing in others. And in many ways it felt like a piece of software with two brains, but no single trail of thought.

By comparison, Windows 10 is what Windows 8 should’ve been. It’s focused, fast, and most importantly it feels like the first truly impressive step forward for the Windows platform in years. And judging by Microsoft’s ambitious goal to put Windows 10 on anything from a tablet to a smartphone, this is a great sign.

But still, what’s new? And is it enough to switch? Well, let’s find out.


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No more schizophrenia

Windows 10 tries to create a more seamless relationship between the desktop and touch-optimised Modern UI – and even at this early stage in W10’s life, it does a pretty decent job. Modern apps are now windowed when launched, and there are new keyboard shortcuts to snap them to the edges of your screen.

The sense of jolting from one world to another is now gone, although there’s still a lot of work to do in ironing out the creases – right now, those windowed Modern apps in W10 look like (and in many cases are functionally close to) expanded mobile apps.

windows-10-screenshot-09_1Multiple desktops
Is that sarcasm we hear from the Mac brigade out there?

Fair enough, OS X has touted Exposé for eons – but that doesn’t mean that Windows 10’s plural desktops are any less welcome. You activate them in W10 by tapping Win-tab, or – with a touch screen – swiping in from the left. And you can switch between them using Ctrl-Win + the left or right keys.

They need work, though: as we point out later on, flipping windows between desktops is some way from obvious. But we’ve no doubt that Microsoft will sort this before 10 hits full release next year.

By the way, don’t get it into your head that you can create an infinite number of desktops: in this release at least, they seem limited to the width of the screen (in the case of our Surface Pro 3, that’s eight desktops).

windows-10-screenshot-07All-new Start menu
Well, kind of. In fact, W10’s ‘new’ Start is the bastard brother of the tiled UI from Windows 8, and the old school Start menu from Windows 7. But although it doesn’t represent a design breakthrough, it does work (which is more than many would say for W8’s Modern Start).

You can move your apps around in much the same way as you could in Windows 8.1 Update: either click or tap to drag and move, or right-click or hold to re-size. It looks good, it’s flexible and should improve further as Microsoft polishes the UI (particular the iconography from today’s Windows desktop, which currently looks cramped and dated in the new interface).

There are bugs to squish, as you’d expect. The entire Start menu can be resized from the top of the panel; we found that if you squash it down, the tiled area will run off the right-hand edge of your screen – we’ll assume that this won’t happen with the final release.

windows-10-screenshot-04Spit and polish for the Windows desktop UIIt needs to go a long way to equal the pixel-perfect gloss of Apple’s OS X Yosemite, but there are early signs of the Microsoft design team getting its freak on.

File Explorer’s the most noticeable update at this early stage – it pops into view with a subtle new transition, and looks discernibly cleaner (thanks in no small part to the absence of coloured borders to the windows).

There’s also a new set of icons for the likes of This PC, Homegroup and Network – flat, muted blue and olive green affairs that are infinitely more modern that their over-designed predecessors. Let’s just hope that Microsoft keeps on going: we may actually get a Windows desktop that you stare at for the hell of it.


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Worst Windows 10 sacrifices: Automatic updates

Not a missing feature, but a change few will welcome. Although the Pro and Enterprise editions of Widows 10 will both give the end user or network admin the opportunity to decide when updates are installed, Windows 10 Home users have no control. Windows Updates will be downloaded and installed automatically as soon as they’re available. This is a classic Microsoft move: it probably makes sense for the entire herd to be immune from security flaws, but end users will not like being forced to install updates at Microsoft’s will.

We will reserve judgment until we see how it works, but for now we will say that the idea of automatic Windows Updates sounds like a recipe for horror and disaster! (See also: How to remove Windows 10 nag messages.)

Worst Windows 10 sacrifices: Goodbye Windows Media Center

Less painful than automatic updates to the OS, upgrading will mean saying goodbye to Windows Media Center. The largely unloved entertainment centre of your PC will be despatched, to be replaced by a series of native media-playing capabilities and apps that don’t require a separate ‘Center’. In almost all ways this is unlikely to be too much of a pain, but we have heard from people testing the beta build that in the current iteration of Windows 10 there is no support for TV tuners, for instance.

This sounds plausible. As we outline below DVD playback capability is not native to Windows 10, and it is likely that only a few people use a TV tuner in a world in which most television content is available online. But that doesn’t mean *no-one* will miss those features.

Worst Windows 10 sacrifices: No more Hearts

Look. There is no other way of telling you this. It’s not you, it’s Microsoft. Microsoft has only gone and remove the card game Hearts from Windows. That’s right: install Windows 10 and you will no longer be able to play Hearts. Heartsbroken. (See also: Windows 8 vs Windows 10 comparison.)

Worst Windows 10 sacrifices: Desktop Gadgets begone

Remember Windows 7’s Desktop Gadgets? No. The chances are you probably don’t. But if you are the one person who uses Desktop Gadgets, you need to prepare yourself for a loss. In Windows 10, there are no Desktop Gadgets. None.

Worst Windows 10 sacrifices: Discs are destroyed

This may not be the biggest issue, but if you are currently using floppy disks on Windows you will have to install new drivers when you upgrade to Windows 10. I rather expect that will affect only a few people.

Perhaps more users will be distressed to know that according to Microsoft anyone who wishes to watch a DVD on their Windows 10 PC or laptop will have to install separate playback software. Microsoft has hinted that it will address this issue at some point, but from the get go if you want to watch a disc you will need to install VLC player or something similar. A pain, but probably a minor pain. (See also: How to get Microsoft Edge browser in Windows 10.)


Verdict

Like we said, there’s so much more to love about Windows 10. Notifications are awesome, you get quick access to settings, we finally have support for full virtual desktops, task switching is better than ever and more. Even better, Microsoft is treating Windows 10 more like “Windows as a service,” which means we can expect frequent updates. This is just a start, and we’ll work to bring you additional coverage of Windows 10 soon.


Windows 10 set for July 29 release

windows61810756_A-_3286266bIt’s finally here – the long-awaited release of the new Windows 10 operating system from Microsoft has been confirmed for July 29. The tech giant is skipping number 9, making this the latest release since Windows 8 failed to live up to expectations. That means Microsoft has gone back to the drawing board, and emerged with countless impressive features. If you’re ready to get started with Windows 10 this summer, here’s what you need to know.

You can get it for free

They say the best things in life are free, and that might just be the case with Windows 10. Microsoft has kept its word about making its newest operating system free to access – at least if you’re currently running an authentic version of Windows 7 or 8.1, its two most recent releases. You’ll enjoy a free lifetime upgrade to Windows 10 provided you make the move within the next year and, better still, it’s an automatic upgrade directly from your existing Windows 7 or 8.1 interface. If you’re running an older version of Windows, you’ll need to make a fresh install and you’ll also need to pay – the various available versions of Windows 10 are expected to retail starting at $119.

It’s being launched in phases

Although the official release date is July 29, in reality Microsoft is expected to undertake a phased launch. This means that you might not end up using the brand new Windows 10 on July 29 itself – instead, Microsoft is likely to make the new operating system available to desktop and laptop users first, and only later to mobile and other devices. What’s more, the firm already has its next move in the pipeline. Upgrade and update plans for Windows 10 are anticipated to be on the way in two phases, in June and October 2016. But we are expecting these changes, codenamed Redstone, to come in the form of more minor tweaks to the Windows 10 infrastructure rather than a full overhaul.

It’s the last you’ll see of Windows

Microsoft has made no secret of the fact that it sees Windows 10 as the operating system’s final release. But that’s not quite as ultimate as it sounds – this is not really the end of Windows. Instead, what we’re seeing is the transition of Windows from a product to a service. Microsoft envisions a future where, instead of major new versions of Windows emerging every few years, there are regular improvements and updates – far beyond the WIndows Updates that we know at the moment.

It’s likely that version numbers will come to play far less of a role in system updates in the future – in much the same way as mobile apps operate, we’ll instead settle into enjoying a frequently updated service that incorporates the latest features Microsoft has developed. And while some have expressed fears that this could lead to home and business users being tied into a subscription model in order to stay up to date, Microsoft appears committed to ensuring that ongoing upgrades are free.

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